Cultured Cashew Yogurt With Cinnamon-Pear Compote

Cultured Cashew Yogurt With Cinnamon-Pear Compote - Rune Haus Recipes

Research has proven that our brains and stomachs have an intricate communication system called the gut-brain-axis.(1)  Meaning, when we cultivate the right blend of gut bacteria, it can benefit, not only our physical health but also our mental wellbeing.  Similarly, if we neglect our microbiome, it may lead to mental health issues. Dysbiosis and inflammation of the gut have been linked to causing mental illnesses including anxiety and depression, which are prevalent in society today.(2) Luckily, probiotics can help. Pre and probiotics have been shown to improve the health of our gut bacteria and, in turn, strengthen our waking stress responses, and overall mental health. (3)

cultured cashew yogurt
pear compote recipe

So, what, exactly, is a probiotic? According to the 2001UH/WHO expert science panel, the official definition of probiotics is “live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host.”(4)

They work by traveling through your colon, interacting with your immune cells, gut cells, dietary nutrients, and existing bacteria to deliver benefits. Some strands of bacteria produce byproducts like short-chain fatty acids, which have been shown to be beneficial for metabolic and immune health. (5)

Beneficial gut bacteria can be supported by adding probiotic-rich foods into our diets. Examples of this are cultured yogurts, kimchi, kombucha, miso and other fermented foods, including this vegan cultured cashew yogurt with cinnamon, pear compote! Letting the yogurt, which is as easy as a smoothie, ferment for 12-24 hours gives it a delicious tang and lots of belly beneficial bacteria.


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Cultured Cashew Yogurt With Cinnamon-Pear Compote

Beneficial gut bacteria can be supported by adding probiotic rich foods into our diets. Examples of this are cultured yogurts, kimchi, kombucha, miso and other fermented foods, including this vegan cultured cashew yogurt with cinnamon, pear compote! Letting the yogurt, which is as easy as a smoothie, ferment for 12-24 hours gives it a delicious tang and lots of belly beneficial bacteria.

Makes: Serves 2-4

Cook time: 20 minutes, plus 12 hours

Ingredients
  • 1 cup raw cashews, soaked overnight, drained
  • 1 Tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoon Raw honey, plus more for topping
  • 2 probiotic capsules (I use Seed)
  • 2 Tablespoons coconut sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon, plus more for topping
  • Large pinch of kosher salt
  • 2 Bosc pears peeled, quartered and cored
  • 1 Tablespoon bee pollen

Recipe Preparation
  1. Purée cashews, lemon juice, salt, and 2 tsp. honey in a blender. With the motor running, stream in ½–⅔ cup water until smooth and the cashews are a similar texture to yogurt.
  2. Transfer to a medium bowl. Open both capsules into yogurt and mix well.
  3. Cover bowl with cheese cloth and let sit for at least 12 hours.
  4. For compote, mix coconut sugar, lime juice, cinnamon and salt in heavy large saucepan. Add pears and toss gently to coat.
  5. Cover and cook over medium-low heat until pears are just tender, stirring occasionally, 10 to 12 minutes.
  6. Transfer mixture to bowl. Can be made 1 day ahead. Chill until cold, then cover and keep chilled.
  7. Once yogurt has cultured, top with pear compote, cinnamon, honey and bee pollen.

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vegan cashew yogurt

Resources:

  1. Reardon S. Gut-brain link grabs neuroscientists. Nature. 2014;515(7526):175-177. doi:10.1038/515175a

  2. Clapp M, Aurora N, Herrera L, Bhatia M, Wilen E, Wakefield S. Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: the gut-brain axis. Clinics and Practice. 2017;7(4). doi:10.4081/cp.2017.987 Clapp et al. - 2017 - Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health the gut-.pdf.

  3. De Palma G, Collins SM, Bercik P, Verdu EF. The microbiota–gut–brain axis in gastrointestinal disorders: stressed bugs, stressed brain or both? J Physiol. 2014;592(Pt 14):2989-2997. doi:10.1113/jphysiol.2014.27399

  4. Morelli L, Capurso L. FAO/WHO Guidelines on Probiotics: 10 Years Later. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 2012;46:S1. doi:10.1097/MCG.0b013e318269fdd5

  5. Probiotics 101 : Seed. https://seed.com/probiotics-101/.Accessed November 14, 2018.